New Term starts with a new class!

The new term brings a new class of learners to LVS Oxford and everyone has settled back into their lessons well.  The KS3 learners have been using the ICT suite to access online maths tools.  To meet the varying range of abilities in class they started their maths learning journey together and are currently following individual learning journeys that suit their individual abilities.  Some students are working at level 3, some at 5 and some at A Level. 

Students working at the higher levels take part in directed learning with Dr Vanessa Cheel a lecturer from Oxford University, who comes into school to work with the highly able students on maths and science.

Teacher Amy Willis who is working with the new class at LVS Oxford said “in a school like LVS Oxford for learners with a diagnosis on the autistic spectrum there can be large discrepancies between the learners’ academic abilities.  We have put together individual learning plans and timetables for our students to make sure we are meeting their needs.  We are using a common theme in class so that we are working as a group but each at the level we need.   This term our theme is 3rd world countries and we have been looking at the Oxfam ‘Everyone counts’ campaign and looking at the countries and the people that live there’. 

 

All of the classes at LVS Oxford have the latest white board technology to help them access information and learning online and share their work in class.  Students and teaching staff use the equipment to support their work.

 

 

 

 

The school is lucky to have a number of musically gifted students and celebrates their talent at end of term events.  During term time music lessons can be arranged to encourage the learners’ progression. 

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher Claire Chaney has been working across the school with students reading Skellig.  The book is deliberately ambiguous as the Author never explains what the mysterious character in the book is and the reader is required to imagine for themselves who or what is Skellig.   

This encourages readers to discuss the book and interpret it themselves, particularly good for young people with a diagnosis on the spectrum who can sometimes have difficulty understanding and predicting other people’s intentions and behaviour, and imagining situations that are outside their own routine.

 

Parents and carers speak positively about the ways in which staff promote positive behaviour. One said "staff are very caring, they talk to students positively and handle things fairly"
Ofsted Residential Report Jan 2016
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